intervention

Addiction Treatment After Overdose

treatmentConvincing people that they could be helped by addiction treatment is no easy task. Even when it is obvious to the individual that treatment is required. We have written several times about how deadly untreated mental health disorders can be. As well as the fact that most people in need of treatment never get it. But, without treatment the likelihood of premature death is extremely high.

With some use disorders, the road to premature death is often long and painful. Typically, it is the exact opposite with opioids narcotics. Whether it be prescription opioids or heroin, the risk of fatal overdose is staggering. Even when an overdose is not fatal, the risk of another overdose in the near future is high. It is not uncommon for overdose victims to have many, before finally not coming back.

Whether you are in recovery, or not, it is possible that you wonder why an overdose victim doesn’t seek help? After all, it is easy to think that an overdose would be enough to urge someone into treatment. While it is common for overdose to precipitate treatment, it is also quite common for victims to head back to drugs.

Encouraging Overdose Victims Into Treatment

Many addiction experts agree that the time right after an overdose is best for talking to individuals about recovery. Experiencing an overdose is terrifying and not without pain. The opioid overdose antidote naloxone causes the body to undergo rapid withdrawal, it is no walk in the park. Sitting in a hospital bed after nearly dying (one would think), should be a wakeup call. Anyone who has come back from an overdose will tell you how broken they felt. The experience puts things into perspective.

However, those very same people might also share how they went back out and used again. That there were no resources available to help them seek recovery support when they came to. Being discharged and sent on their miserable way towards inevitably the next overdose. With each fatal overdose in the U.S. every day, there are roughly 30 nonfatal overdoses, NPR reports. Sadly, interventions after overdose don’t happen enough, according to a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The paper showed that among people who had overdosed on heroin, the filling of opioid prescriptions fell by 3.5 percent, the article reports. But, medication-assisted treatment increased by only 3.6 percent. Just 33 percent of heroin and 15 percent of prescription opioid overdose survivors were prescribed:

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naltrexone
  • Methadone

“This is a time when people are vulnerable, potentially frightened by this event that’s just occurred and amenable to advice, referral and treatment recommendations,” said senior author, Julie Donohue, associate professor of health policy and management at the University of Pittsburgh. “It’s safe to characterize it as a missed opportunity for the health system to respond.”

Addiction Treatment After Overdose

If you have experienced an overdose recently and are still using, please contact Synergy Group Services. The longer treatment is put off, the greater the chance you will experience another overdose. And the next one may not end with a reversal. It is possible to recover from an opioid use disorder, let us help.

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